The Better Ageing Podcast

Episode 29: Exercises to reduce the risk of falls: research review | The Better Ageing Podcast

October 21, 2021 New Tricks Co Episode 29
The Better Ageing Podcast
Episode 29: Exercises to reduce the risk of falls: research review | The Better Ageing Podcast
Show Notes

Did you know that a third of people over the age of 65 living at home have a fall each year? Given that falls in older age can often lead to a rapid decline in independence it's a startling statistic! However, reducing the risk of falling is something everyone can do right now, and you can even do it from home.

In this episode of The Better Ageing Podcast we're discussing falls and balance. In particular we look at recent research that outlines the positive impact exercise can have in reducing one's risk of falling. In our discussion we look at the types of exercise that have the biggest positive impact, how often you should be exercising, and what someone can start focusing on right now to improve their balance and strength.

As always, we hope this episode helps you better understand your own health and wellbeing and how you can care for those you love too. If you have any questions at all, please don't hesitate to get in touch with us: https://newtricksco.com.au/contact/

Show notes/ topics covered:

0:07 - Welcome 
1:02 - Introduction to driving into old age 
2:00 - What do we know about falls? 
3:19 - Exercise can help reduce risk of falls 
4:01 - Cochrane review 
5:09 - What exercises did the research find were most beneficial? 
6:48 - How often do you need to exercise? 
8:42 - What should someone focus on now? 
9:39  - Closing thoughts 

About the experts: 

Jason Lee and Dr Jane Fyfield have over 45 years of experience working with elderly Australians. Jason Lee runs his own physiotherapy practice, with a focus on strength and conditioning programs for over 60 year olds. Dr Jane Fyfield works as a consultant to aged care services, is a former Medical Director, and has worked in the public, private and government sectors as a clinician and a non-clinical consultant.